TERRACOTTEM ON THE CAPE VERDEAN ISLANDS

Field research at the Isla do Santiago (1987)

Our scientific research on the soil conditioner TerraCottem started in 1981. Numerous trials set up in Belgium in 1982-1984 proved that this water-storing mixture of granules and powders enabled us to grow food crops in dry regions with a minimum of rainwater and fertilizers. In those first years, TerraCottem was already widely used in flower pots and flower boxes in our country.


At the beginning of 1987, we were invited by the FAO in Rome and by the Cape Verdean government to provide proof on the island of Santiago that the application of TerraCottem on a dry slope would have a positive effect on the production of various vegetables.


In April 1987, a reconnaissance trip was launched to find out, together with local farmers and a Belgian representative of the FAO, where on the island of Santiago it would be best to set up a demonstration trial. After a tour of the island, it was decided to choose a site near the home of farmer Jorge, who himself was active as a technician on an FAO project.


Here is a photo report of that exploration:

Growing potatoes in bags

A message from Vien Tran NgocDa Nang, Vietnamhttps://www.ganjing.com/video/1fi63s4u0kr6yYqsrY8KQd65D11e1c?fbclid=IwAR3rFlKavyJB_YlD3fYqLhW9nhT2bGdOOl6RngU1Dbm_NzXZt8wGhBhromY

Growing potatoes at home in bins

A message from Orina Dominic – Kenya – https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=166751076089464&set=pcb.1324207528416176

If this happens in Ghana, why couldn’t it happen in Malawi too

A message from Taaluma

Mary runs a school in the Volta region of Ghana. Most of the 90 children in the school receive one meal a day, provided by Mary. Often, the children must miss school to work in the fields with their parents.

Sack gardens and self-watering gardens provide vegetables, so they can continue their education.

At Taaluma, we are proud to be a part of this solution – https://www.facebook.com/Taalumanet/photos/a.495498750471094/4852765954744330/

Food insecurity is intimately linked to #ClimateChange, so developing agricultural methods respectful of the environment, as does Taaluma, is incredibly important #IWD2022

On this International women’s day we honor the incredible women we work with in Ghana. Thank you Make Every Woman Count (MEWC) for the shout out on twitter and instagram!

Alternative gardening not only provides food to sustain families, but also a sense of pride. At Taaluma, we believe that enabling others through education and training will help to reverse a pattern of food insecurity and allow children to remain in school.

According to World Food Organization and other UN agencies, our world is facing a global food shortage unlike anything we have ever faced in a century. We all need to start changing the way we look into our lives and adapt to the new reality of the post COVID19 world.

We can make small changes, that each, may not seems like much, but when billions of people do it, it will change our world and make it a better place for us to live. And for some it is a matter of life and death! Remember, a drop of rain, is nothing, but when they all get together, they create an ocean!

Orina Dominic (Kenya) took the lead

SACKS AND CONTAINERS VEGETABLE GARDENING TIPS STARTS NOW!

What is a KITCHEN GARDEN?

● A kitchen garden is an area or space within your compound where vegetables, fruit, herbs are grown for domestic use.

Example of vegetables

●Leafy green – lettuce, spinach and silverbeet. ●Cruciferous – cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and broccoli.

●Marrow – pumpkin, cucumber and zucchini.

●Root – potato, carrots,sweet potato and yam.

Examples herbs

Basil

Rosemary

Parsley

Chives

Lemongrass

Leaf celery

Cilantro

Fennel

mint

Examples of Fruits

●Citrus – oranges, grapefruits, mandarins and limes.

●Stone fruit – nectarines, apricots, peaches and plums.

●Tropical and exotic – bananas and mangoes.

●Berries – strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, kiwifruit and passionfruit.

●Belons – watermelons, rockmelons and honeydew melons.

DO YOU HAVE YOUR KITCHEN GARDEN? – https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=164776059620299&set=gm.1318697178967211&idorvanity=660815971422005

Do people likle garlic in Malawi ?

A message from Norman Elaine Rosie (Liverpool)

I only put these garlic bulbs in the glasses yesterday and they are showing 1/4” long roots. This is brilliant. I’m following advice showing a small plastic bowl being used. I now need to find out about compost/soil and grit mixtures; https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10225194671866391&set=gm.6317481988296197&idorvanity=221343224576801

Something to contribute to the combat of malnourishment in Malawi

A message from Vien Tran Ngoc, Da Nang, Vietnam

GROWING VEGETABLES ON THE TERRACE_ How to make a simple mini greenhouse from plastic bottles

https://www.ganjing.com/video/1fghhv2sgb42ywrf0YldHC98M10g1c?fbclid=IwAR1Ors076fVbRu7fa_WRGfEu_tEulG8gxQ1cE6MjqRDR8RPXFeefjLCmLRA


Recycle Coke Bottles Growing Sprouts At Home

https://www.ganjing.com/video/1ff736dcuoa3bOph8ojm4Ly8R1b81c?fbclid=IwAR2xEOZ9XgUwjap6C1g55KgJVkUmzqeq66ITRwv3q9lVTwBB14os-RYpJ_Q


Growing White Radish Hanging At Home Unexpected Results

https://www.ganjing.com/video/1fe3o134hhp4jZFPlMBZVKG9X1gh1c?fbclid=IwAR3gURCAKj-MwoftgIA5wNzPXAt3fdhCFUkeuefUAsdC3EjSH7S5hDmxmz4

Could this be something for Malawi to help assuring food security ?

A message from David Lawson

I’ve got limited space for growing crops. Im going to try to grow crops in hanging containers like these. What plants would be good for containers like these? I’m probably going to put flowers in the top to attract bees. – https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=6296059610444358&set=gm.6304176002960129&idorvanity=221343224576801

Malawi Key Message Update: Erratic start of rainfall season hinders crop production and labor demand (December 2022)

https://reliefweb.int/report/malawi/malawi-key-message-update-erratic-start-rainfall-season-hinders-crop-production-and-labor-demand-december-2022

Key Messages:

  • The government and humanitarian partners are scaling up the humanitarian food assistance program to reach additional districts, and deliveries are expected to scale up further in January and continue through March. Based on the delivery plans, deliveries will gradually expand to cover most of southern Malawi; deliveries began in four districts and Blantyre city in November, with nine more districts and Zomba city reached in December. Given large ration sizes, food assistance is expected to increasingly improve food security outcomes in many districts, likely leading to Stressed (IPC Phase 2!) outcomes in much of the south through March. However, Crisis (IPC Phase 3) outcomes are still expected to persist in some southern and central districts where assistance deliveries have yet to begin, and households experienced large crop and labor income losses earlier this year.
  • Food prices, especially for maize, continue to trend higher than last year and the five-year average despite adequate market food supplies. From October to November, maize grain prices rose by 23 percent, on average, across monitored markets; furthermore, prices ranged from 142 percent to 224 percent higher than the November five-year average. High food prices continue to reduce household purchasing power, especially among very poor and poor households who have depleted their food stocks and have low income to purchase sufficient food.
  • After a delay, the main rainy season (October-March) became fully established in December. However, rainfall distribution is still erratic across time and space, and most of Malawi has received cumulatively below-average rainfall since October. Based on FEWS NET’s analysis of historical crop production data, the shortened growing season for long-cycle crops is expected to reduce total crop yields by up to 10 percent. However, based on short-term rainfall forecasts, normal to above-normal rainfall in late December across most of Malawi is expected to drive recovery in cumulative seasonal rainfall totals. Overall, local, and global forecast models are pointing to a normal to above-normal rainfall season, with localized below-normal rainfall over southern and central Malawi.
  • Although the onset of the rains has seasonally increased farming activity and, therefore, agricultural labor demand, the erratic start of season and other factors are hindering this key source of income. Typically, very poor and poor households earn about 20 to 40 percent of their annual total income from labor. Due to high food prices and consecutive years of below-average crop production, however, labor demand and wage rates are below normal, as middle, and better-off households have fewer resources to hire labor, especially in central and southern Malawi. As a result, households have insufficient cash incomes from agricultural labor to purchase their food and basic non-food needs.
  • ====
  • High food prices continue to reduce household purchasing power, especially among very poor and poor households who have depleted their food stocks and have low income to purchase sufficient food.

I wonder what the result would be if those Malawian friends would have started food production in containers (Prof. Dr. Willem Van Cotthem – Ghent University, Belgium)

Youth group support the elderly in their community and we suggest the building of wall gardens !

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/hashtag/malawi/?trk=public_post-text

Mbedza

I know we say this a lot, but we really do love our youth group. Raising the funds amongst themselves, they set out to provide basic necessities to the elderly families surrounding our Songani Hope and Wellness Centre. Read the full story here: https://buff.ly/3VeqHB7

#mbedzamalawi #mbedza #internationalcharity #malawi #africacharity #malawicharity #donatetomalawi #charityintheuk #ukcharities #charitiestodonateto

===

I know we say it alot, but we love our youth group!

Recently, they decided that they would like to donate a number of items to the 10 elderly families around our Songani Center. With little resources to achieve this goal, they raised the funds amongst themselves and set out to visit their chosen beneficiaries.

Their visit aimed to encourage the elderly as they face varying challenges in their older years. There was excitement and joy, as the youths presented them with gifts containing some basic necessities such as Soap, soya pieces, cooking oil, sugar and salt. In return, the elderly shared some advice to the youth on how to live a long and healthy life. 

Mr Mbile receiving his gift from The Hope Ambassadors

Mr Mbile, who is 82 years, advised the Hope Ambassadors to abstain from engaging in premature sexual relations since it is one of the major causes of low life expectancy in Malawi. He gave an account of how life was different in his youth compared to now. 

“There are alot of dangers now, a lot of emerging epidemics such as HIV/AIDS. During our time things were smooth as we did not have such deadly pandemics, or such decayed habits such as drinking and smoking.” He is very confident that he is still strong and healthy in his old age because he abstained from sex at an early age. 

In his remarks he pointed out that he was worried for the younger generation as there is has been an alarming rise in the rates of suicide in Malawi. He therefore advised the Hope Ambassadors to continue being around each other for moral support and that they continue to abstain from drug and substance abuse.

Another beneficiary, Mrs Mdala, was very thankful and she asked the hope ambassadors to continue working with the community in such a way.

During the visit one woman, Abiti Sani, shared a very moving story with the group.

Mrs Sani receiving her gift from The Hope Ambassadors

“In my old age, I have received many impolite sentiments from people. Some of them called me a witch because I am poor and old. This gesture will forever remain in my heart as it has shown me my relevance in this society. So thank you.” Our youth club decided to extend their charity by providing farm labour to her family. As it is the planting season in Malawi, the beneficiary shed tears of joy and commended the youth for their kind gesture. 

The elderly are very thankful for the visit as it makes them feel visible and an important part of the community. Their inability to perform physical tasks such as farming and run small scale businesses is a challenge to their lives, especially with the rising cost of living.

This act of kindness from the young Hope Ambassadors has brought joy to the elderly in their community.

===

MY COMMENT (Prof. dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM – Ghent University, Belgium)

PLEASE CONSIDER THE BUILDING OF WALL GARDENS FOR FOOD PRODUCTION

First of all I want to congratulate the MBEDZA Malawi organization for the magnificent work performed up to now. I see that excellent interventions for the elderly people have been leading to remarkable improvement of the daily standards of living of many in the region.

It leads me to the expression of my hope that the responsible people of MBEDZA could set up actions to construct wall gardens for the elderly people in need of direct aid for sufficient nutrients.

Wall gardens are very easy to construct at the lowest costs. Please find here a short description of the way I have been building a wall garden at my home in Belgium and I wish you a lot of success when you are achieving wall gardens for the Malawian elderly people.

HOW DO WE BUILD A WALL GARDEN?

We construct a wall garden with storage boxes – see photo 1 :

Photo 1 : Storage box


Buiding the bottom layer of 2 storage boxes

The easiest way to set up a wall garden against a facade or a wall is to build 2 towers of plastic storage boxes (bins) next to each other. For each tower we will stack 3-4 rows of bins high to the easy reach height. We drill holes with a diameter of 3-4 cm in 3 side walls of such a container. The distance between those holes is determined by the size (girth) of the plants that will grow in them. We can place young plants (vegetables, herbs, flower plants, etc.) through the holes, so that their roots can continue to grow in the soil inside the containers. The fourth side wall (the back side) will not have any holes because it will stand against the facade or wall.

Photo 2 – The 2 bottom boxes filled with potting soil and planted with cuttings of Coleus.

First we put a layer of potting soil (or garden soil) on the bottom of each bottom container up to the height of the lowest hole (or the lowest holes if these are drilled at the same height). We spray water over that soil layer in the bottom of the boxes to moisten it well, even make it quite wet. Now we plant young planting material in the bottom hole (or holes if there are several of them). Here we have planted seedlings of willow trees. The upper parts of the plants (stems and leaves) protrude through the holes, their root system lies inside on the first layer of soil in the bottom of the box. Over those first root systems we lay a second layer of soil up to the height of the higher, middle holes. We also spray this second layer of soil abundantly to lower the soil level a bit. In this way we can apply new young plants (Coleus) to that higher layer (see the green stems and leaves outwards, roots inwards). Over that second set, middle root systems, a new layer of soil comes up to the height of the top holes, in which again young reddish Coleus cuttings are planted.

Photo 3 – The 2 bottom boxes filled and planted

Finally, we now fill the container with soil until the container is completely filled yo the edge. We also spray the container abundantly to make the entire contents very moist and to allow the soil to sink as much as possible. We may eventually add an extra layer of soil to fill the container completely to the brim.- (See photos 2 and 3 ).

Photo 4 – A second layer of storage boxes is put on top of the bottom one.


The bins of the second row are placed on top of the soil of the bottom row. We drill a few holes in the bottom of these second row bins, so that a larger amount of water that could accumulate there (e.g. during prolonged rain) can still pass through to the bottom row of bins. Those of the second row are filled and planted in the same way as the bottom row. This row is also sprayed abundantly to get the soil as moist as possible- (See photo 5).

Photo 5 – The second row of bins is installed

As soon as the second row of bins is placed against the facade or wall, we start filling the bins for the third row. This is of course done in the same way as with the previous row (with drainage holes in the bottom) – (See photo 6) –

Photo 6 – Filling the bins for the third row

In the end, we place three rows of bins against the facade in this way (2 towers, each 3 bins high) – (See photos 7 to 8) –

Photo 7 – Placing the third layer of boxes on top of the 2 previous ones

Photo 8 – Three layers of boxes filled and planted

Photo 9 – The wall garden is almost completed

The wall of our wall or facade garden is now complete. In this example it is planted with various flowering plants (ornamental plants). Of course you can also turn it into a vegetable or herb garden.

Photo 10 – A complete wall garden with a water reservoir (water tank) on top

Finally, we put another container without holes in the side walls on top. It is the water tank (water reservoir); which we can occasionally fill with water. In the 2 side walls of it, which each rise above a tower, we drill 1 hole of e.g.2 mm. Once filled, the water slowly (like a “pisser”) flows through those 2 holes in the soil of the top row of bins. – (See photo 10) –

———-

The demonstration model of this wall garden was built by my Belgian friends Gilbert VAN DAMME and Camiel BAUTS, both of whom we congratulate for an excellent job done. The yellow boxes were donated to us for free by the Bakery BUYLE in Zaffelare (Belgium).

====

WHAT ARE THE BIG ADVANTAGES OF A WALL GARDEN?


(1) A large number of plants per unit area, e.g. 60 or more per half square meter (see our example below). This number (depending on the plant species) could also be increased to the maximum without additional costs.


(2) Lower costs than food crop production with traditional horticultural methods.


(3) Amount of water used = only 30% of normal watering.

(4) If this technique were to be applied in classical arable farming (agroculture), then on the same surface area, eg 1 hectare, up to 10 times more could be harvested with significantly less watering.

Are you convinced that it would be a good idea to apply container horticulture and vertical horticulture (but also in agriculture!) on a large scale? It would certainly help to eradicate child malnutrition and famine!


Can people be convinced about these advantages everywhere in the world ?
YES WE CAN !!! WHY NOT ?

Hunger and Cholera

https://reliefweb.int/report/malawi/cholera-outbreak-worsens-malawi-hunger-increases

Approximately 5.4 million individuals are facing hunger in Malawi. This cocktail of cholera and hunger creates a dangerous cycle that poses a great risk to the nation. When the affected do not receive sufficient nutrients, this poses a great risk to their immunity, which becomes severely weakened. Without immediate medical attention, the repercussions could be fatal.

===

MY COMMENT (Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM – Ghent University, Belgium)

I do not understand why the Malawian authorities and experts are not deciding to use all available sources to generalize family food production through application of container gardening. This worldwide applied food production method offers a possibility to deliver a sufficient quantity of nutrients to every single family, wherever the people live, in urban and countryside areas.

Every single wall garden would help to keep cholera away.

Cholera Outbreak Worsens in Malawi as Hunger Increases

https://reliefweb.int/report/malawi/cholera-outbreak-worsens-malawi-hunger-increases

Malawi has been grappling with a devastating cholera outbreak that has affected entire communities as the country experiences a worsening hunger crisis. Government reports released in November indicate that there was a 33.5% increase in reported cholera cases in October, compared to September. With the rainy season about to start, there are fears that there could be a spike in cases. Despite a combination of interventions, including a vaccine drive that started in May 2022, the outbreak has kept on spreading and has now affected all 28 districts in the Country.

Amos Zaindi, CARE Malawi Country Director said, “We are particularly concerned about the impact the outbreak will have on the vulnerable in the community, especially pregnant and lactating mothers as well as mothers with toddlers. This is also because many are still recovering from last year’s floods.

“From late 2021 to early 2022, rainfall and effects of strong typhoons and cyclones in Southern Africa caused severe flooding devastating the lives of communities across Malawi. This led to the loss of life and property, and subsequently the cholera outbreak which was declared by the government on 3rd March 2022. Over the years’ extreme rains as well as stronger cyclones and typhoons, caused by climate change, have worsened flooding cases in the country.”

Despite making economic strides, Malawi remains one of the world’s poorest nations. Over 80% of the country depends on agriculture with most being subsistence farmers who depend on rainfed agriculture. Therefore, extreme weather conditions hamper the growth of the country. With over 70% of the country living on less than $1.25 a day and with limited access to sanitation facilities, the cholera outbreak worsens.

Approximately 5.4 million individuals are facing hunger in Malawi. This cocktail of cholera and hunger creates a dangerous cycle that poses a great risk to the nation. When the affected do not receive sufficient nutrients, this poses a great risk to their immunity, which becomes severely weakened. Without immediate medical attention, the repercussions could be fatal.

Government reports indicate that the sick are arriving at treatment centers already severely impacted by the disease. Many fatalities have occurred in the communities and or at facilities due to people coming late for treatment. Religious beliefs are contributing to late reporting to the health center, and this is leading to the further spread of the disease. As of 30th October, reports showed that most of the fatalities were aged above 25 years.

Another danger the outbreak poses is the erosion of Women and girls’ advancements that have been made in the past. Billy Molosoni, CARE Malawi Gender Justice and Advocacy Lead said, “As the cholera outbreak persists, the primary caregivers — women and girls — will be overburdened with extra work. This will not only expose them to the risk of contracting the disease, but it will also impact girls’ education and women’s economic empowerment as they prioritize taking care of the infected.”

CARE will be engaged in various activities to reach the affected. This includes the provision of chlorine powder for water purification to the District Health Offices to be distributed in health centers, schools, and households, the distribution of gloves for medical personnel and waste disposal, and supplying Oral Rehydration solutions for the affected.

As the rainy season, which has been forecasted to bring above-average rainfall, starts in December CARE will continue to support the Malawi Ministry of Health. “Through collaboration with our local partners, we will be carrying out preparedness activities. These include revamping and training community Health workers and partner staff in readiness for the upcoming season. At the same time, we will be supporting the Ministry with logistical support to reach communities in the rural areas with vaccines,” said Amos Zaindi. These will be done via radio messages, discussions, and awareness messages on posters.

The Tropical Cyclone 2022 -2023 outlook by FAO forecasts that Malawi is likely going to be hit by five cyclones.

For more information please contact:

Anisa Husain
CARE Press Officer
Anisa.Husain@care.org

IMF approves $88.3 million for Malawi under ‘food shock’ loan window

By Syndicated Content

Nov 21, 2022 | 6:24 PM

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The International Monetary Fund said its executive board on Monday approved an $88.3 million disbursement to Malawi under the new “food shock window” emergency lending facility launched in response to food price spikes and shortages caused by Russia’s war in Ukraine.

The IMF also said the executive board assessed that a previously approved staff-monitored policy program for Malawi linked to the food shock loan is “sufficiently robust to meet the stated objectives” and was expected to build a track record for a more formal IMF loan arrangement.

(Reporting by David Lawder; Editing by Chris Reese)

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https://www.yahoo.com/now/malawi-becomes-first-low-income-075036706.html

Malawi Becomes First Low-Income Nation to Get IMF Food-Shock Loan

Monique Vanek and Matthew Hill

Tue, November 22, 2022

Malawi became the first low-income nation to receive financing from the International Monetary Fund under a new tool intended to help countries cope with global food price shocks.

The south east African country will get $88.3 million to “address urgent balance-of-payments needs and mitigate the impact of the food shock,” according to a statement. Separately, the fund and South Sudan reached a staff-level deal to provide the nation with $112.7 million in emergency financing, which needs to be approved by IMF’s board.

Both nations have been suffering from rising cost of rations and have seen their foreign-exchange reserves dwindle. Annual food inflation in Malawi has more than doubled to 34.5% since Russia invaded Ukraine in February, while two-thirds of South Sudan’s population face severe food insecurity, according to the IMF.

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MY COMMENT (Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM – Ghent University, Belgium)

I can only hope that a substantial part of this financial aid to Malawi will be used to apply at a massive scale the introduction of container gardening and the building of at least one wall garden for every Malawian family.

This would solve the major problems of food insecurity in the country.

Refugees in Malawi Seize WFP Vehicle in Protest Over Food Rations

https://www.voanews.com/a/refugees-in-malawi-seize-wfp-vehicle-in-protest-over-food-rations-/6820576.html

BLANTYRE, MALAWI — 

Refugees in Malawi’s Dzaleka camp who were removed from a food rations list have protested and seized a World Food Program vehicle.

The WFP removed about 600 refugee families comprising nearly 2,500 people from the list for receiving food rations in February, saying they were self-sustaining and citing inadequate funding. But some families, mainly from the Democratic Republic of Congo, say they are now struggling with food insecurity.

The refugees started the protests Wednesday, demanding the WFP officials resume providing them with rations, saying that living without food assistance has become unbearable. WFP officials say that between 20 and 30 demonstrators in and around the Community Hall are protesting the assessment procedure, but the situation in the camp is calm.

“I cannot work so that I can feed my family, but I am very hungry,” said Ndaize Eliwude, a refugee from Burundi who arrived at the Dzaleka camp in 2002. “I am not castigating or insulting them, I am just complaining that they did not do a good job to remove me from the list, because now I am not managing to get some food for my household.”

The protesters are holding on to the vehicle they seized from WFP officials Wednesday during the protests.

“It is just an act of symbolizing that this car belongs to the company that would give us food and it has taken food from us,” Eliwude said. “So now, let us hold it so that the owners can know that we are here and that we are hungry.”

Refugees at the Dzaleka refugee camp in Malawi are protesting the removal of 600 refugee families from the World Food Program's list of people receiving food rations. Nov. 4, 2022. (Photo courtesy of the protesters.)

Refugees at the Dzaleka refugee camp in Malawi are protesting the removal of 600 refugee families from the World Food Program’s list of people receiving food rations. Nov. 4, 2022. (Photo courtesy of the protesters.)

Badre Bahaji, head of communications for WFP in Malawi, said the refugees took the car as the WFP officials left a meeting with partners on the camp premises.

“The meeting went very well but after 11:30 a.m. [the] WFP vehicle and staff were prevented from leaving the camp,” Bahaji said. “So the refugees surrounded the vehicle, preventing it from leaving. The situation was handled without any violence. After a couple of hours the WFP staff left the camp unharmed. But the WFP vehicle is still blocked in the camp.”

The refugees holding the vehicle said they will release it only if the WFP puts them back on the list of food ration recipients.

Bahaji said the WFP will soon conduct a profiling exercise for all households at the camp, which houses about 52,000 refugees.

He said the exercise will provide an opportunity for all the refugees, including those taken off food ration assistance, to explain their food security situation.

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MY COMMENT (Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM – Ghent University, Belgium)

We all understand that it is totally impossible for the WFP to provide food rations to all the hungry people of this world.

For years already I am defending the reasoning that offering food rations to hungry people can never lead to a final solution for the combat of hunger and malnutrition.

Food rations can only bring a temporary relief for the affected people. The WFP and other help organisations, e.g. a number of NGOs, undeniably deliver excellent work and their actions are most certainly contributing to many life-saving interventions. However, food rations are rather quickly eaten. They disappear within the shortest period, pushing the hunger-affected people repeatedly back in the same shameful situation of malnutrition.

Therefore, we have been arguing for years already that helping hungry people to methods and means of producing their own daily food rations is a far more better solution than the one of spending trillions of dollars at shipping food rations all over the world to people in need.

In 2005-2007 we have been promoting a soil condidtioning method for the production of family gardens for the refugees in the Algerian Sahara desert. More than 2000 family gardens, in which vegetables and herbs have been successfully grown, were built in those 3 years. Unfortunately, this magnificent UNICEF-project was stopped after a terrible attack on the UNO-building at the end of 2007 in Algiers.

Later on, we have clearly shown that the container gardening method offers huge advantages to help malnourished and hungry people to the necessary daily food rations. Since 2010 we have shown that bottle towers and bucket towers offer a lot of possibilities to be applied in the most difficult situations for food production, even in the driest desertified areas. The fact that nowadays more than 485.000 followers are using container towers to grow all sorts of plants shows sufficiently that all aid organisations concerned should urgently switch from delivering food rations to educating people in the container gardening techniques.

Our latest suggestion to solve the hunger problems of this world is focusing on the simple, but very efficient building of wall gardens with towers of storage boxes (see photos). Food crops can easily be grown in the holes drilled in the sidewalls of towers, 3-4 boxes high. As in these towers only a smaller quantity of water is necessary to produce a maximum of food crops, it is clearly an additional positive element to change the strategy of food rations into that of building wall gardens in all the hunger-affected regions.

That would offer all the organisations involved to save billions of dollars.

I hope my Malawian friends will follow my advice : have a look at

David Muni-Wun Preedy‘s message

and find an album with magnificent photos, inviting every Malawian farmer to grow food crops in containers.

See how easy and nice you can get your vegetables, herbs and fruits at home !

NO MORE MALNUTRITION IN MALAWI

Follow these footsteps to a better life in your country.

How to Grow Broad Beans in Containers

https://chokrihomeandgarden.blogspot.com/2020/03/how-to-grow-broad-beans-in-containers.html?fbclid=IwAR2k65vSzkgr-M_E2zDagdcP1Cx1UV76RY8hIBUuOSAWQ4__7nik_E6uqTg

Broad beans are an ideal vegetable to grow in containers, however if you given them the right growing condition and a large container they can be successful!

https://chokrihomeandgarden.blogspot.com/2020/03/how-to-grow-broad-beans-in-containers.html?fbclid=IwAR3mlBSJptQfdc0Nu8YOZw0htfx9fio2cUAelivHDyaoojMem3IXkDkU3ZQ

Elementary Educators’ Guide to Container Gardening

https://kidsgardening.org/the-latest-elementary-guide-container-gardening/?fbclid=IwAR2gauHAq5Q9Gz-QksS4lnJPPnLzj0N74eWGMNC2RgXcXOd9uKIJHiJ9t9k

Big or little, one or many, edibles or flowering plants – container gardens are bursting with potential and the perfect way to begin your garden adventures!

Container gardens are an excellent way to dive into the world of school gardening. As long as you have adequate light and access to water, planting in containers gives you and your students the opportunity to grow a wide variety of crops like vegetables, herbs, flowers, and even fruit trees. Best of all, you don’t need a huge amount of space, time, or money to get started.

Vegetables like eggshells

A message from Syfur RahmanGrays Thurrock, United Kingdom

Why it is important to recycle Eggshells?

Eggshells encourage root growth. The calcium carbonate in eggshells helps to strengthen a plant’s roots so it can grow faster and stronger. Eggshells lower soil acidity, balances the pH levels making the soil more alkaline than acidic. This helps plants absorb nutrients and ward off toxic elements like aluminum.

Eggshells can discourage the development of black spots on the ends of their fruit plant such as tomato plants. Eggshells control pests, the sharp edges of dry, crushed shells are hazardous for the soft bodies of snails and slugs; it keeps the slugs and other insects away.

How to recycle Eggshells?

Simply crush the dried eggshells directly onto the soil above the plant or into the compost bin.

NOTE: it may take time to decompose, but, it will definitely be worth the wait as it helps the plants to grow.

Diana Bennett

I keep a plastic ice cream bucket in my garage for all my egg shells and crush them down to distribute right before I till the garden under in the Fall.

Lamigo Ric

Boiled that in water with vinegar that gives more calcium to the soil by pouring the solution got from boiling egg nut shells.

Syfur Rahman

I put directly in the compost bin first, then a year later I mix with my garden soil & main thing is that worm 🪱 love eggshells

Sandra Holden Brown

Crushed they seemed to disappear in a few days—not because of decomposition, but rabbits, gophers and birds. I now grind them into powder and mix them into the top inch of soil.

For Malawians who like carrots

A message from Chokri Hizem

Carrots are one of the fastest fall vegetables to grow at home. Growing your own organic carrots at home is easy and can provide you color, flavor and nutrition. This popular root vegetable performs best in cool temperatures!

Keep Reading: https://chokrihomeandgarden.blogspot.com/…/how-to-grow…


Do it for your kids !

https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=653335042892335&set=pcb.6077956118915453

Flooding significantly impacts food security, new study finds

https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/967629

Analysis of African nations shows multiple effects of floods on food needs

Peer-Reviewed Publication

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

New research finds that flooding can affect food security for over 5.6 million people across several African nations. The work comes at a time when floods have also devastated Pakistan, India, and large parts of the European Union and the United States.

“Our findings show that floods can impact food security both immediately and in the months after the flood event,” says Connor Reed, a former New York University Center for Data Science graduate student and lead author on the study, “The impact of flooding on food security across Africa,” which appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “In many flood events we assessed, there were substantial damages to infrastructure, croplands, and livestock, which compromised food production and access, as well as water resources and sanitation also critical to food security.”

In recent years, record rainfall and flooding have prompted increased attention to the ramifications for affected populations and pointed to the urgency for a greater understanding of the magnitude of their destruction, particularly on populations’ food needs.

To gain detailed insights into the impact of flood disasters, Reed, along with Sonali Shukla McDermid, an associate professor in NYU’s Department of Environmental Studies, and other colleagues examined more than a dozen countries across western, eastern, and southern Africa, including Nigeria, Niger, Kenya, Mozambique, and Malawi, among others.

Over the studied period (2009-2020), the researchers examined how key flood characteristics, including location, duration, and extent, influence an independent food insecurity metric used by the USAID-created Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET): the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) scale. IPC measures the severity of food insecurity using a five-point scale: minimal food security (IPC 1), stressed (IPC 2), emergency (IPC 3), crisis (IPC 4), and famine (IPC 5). The team measured the impact of flooding over extended periods of time using panel analyses.

The results showed that approximately 12% of those who experienced food insecurity in the studied areas had their food security status affected by flooding over the 2009-2020 period. These impacts included detrimental increases to food insecurity, as expected, but there were also some beneficial impacts that ameliorated food insecurity, depending on the time period and regional scale. 

“Our results suggest that floods can have opposing effects on food security at different spatial scales, particularly at time periods after they occur,” says study co-author Weston Anderson, a research scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Maryland’s Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center. “In a given year, excess precipitation may immediately lead to floods that destroy crops in a localized area while also being associated with beneficial growing conditions that boost crop production on the country-scale.”

The researchers, nevertheless, caution that any positive impacts from flooding are not guaranteed, and these findings instead speak to the importance of improved data collection on flood and food security for disaster response and climate adaptation planning.  

“What we highlight in particular is that flooding has important but complicated impacts on food security at different times and spatial scales,” McDermid says. “This is however largely understudied globally, and therefore not well understood. Improving knowledge of where, when, and to what extent floods affect food security is crucial, especially for decision-makers across flood-prone rural areas that contribute to regional and global food supplies.”

Notably, the results also revealed that flooding significantly affects food security in highly localized and varied ways—as opposed to uniformly across entire countries. The researchers say this indicates that the relationship between flooding and food security is not due to country-wide dynamics (e.g., changes in food prices), but instead to context-specific impacts on food production (e.g., subsistence crop loss), food access (e.g., destruction of infrastructure or direct loss of livelihoods), and/or food utilization (e.g., water-borne diseases and sanitation deficiencies).

“Understanding flood impacts on food security is of growing importance for the humanitarian community,” says co-author Andrew Kruczkiewicz of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society at Columbia University. “With the outputs of this study, the humanitarian community is in a better position to decide what actions, including anticipatory, preparedness and response, to prioritize—or deprioritize—in the areas we studied.”

“This research illustrates how cross-disciplinary teams can generate exponential improvements in our understanding of societal problems,” says Jeffrey Mantz, a program director for the National Science Foundation, which supported the research. “We knew that flooding had downstream impacts, but this study clarifies and quantifies those impacts in ways that will have important benefits for people and communities that are facing increasingly frequent severe weather events.”

The paper’s other authors are Jennifer Nakamura and Richard Seager of Columbia’s Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, and Dominy Gallo, a Columbia undergraduate. 

This research was supported by a collaborative research grant from the National Science Foundation’s Growing Convergence Research Program (OIA #1934955 and #1934978).

====================

MY COMMENT (Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM – Ghent University, Belgium)

In many cases the application of container gardening, and in particular the growing of food crops in “vertical gardening” has been registered as a supplementay factor to save sufficient quantities of food for the local population.

One of the best systems to protect people for “mild” flooding is the building of wall gardens (see photos)

YOU CAN GROW LOTS OF EDIBLE LEMON GRASS

A message of Nan Faulkner – Dallas, Texas

It amazes me that just one stalk of lemongrass can grow & multiplies to this huge bush in less than 4 months. I planted 5 stalks in 5 grow bags; two stalks were dogged up by something which chewed off all the roots. So I have only 3 bushes left. I tried growing in ground & in grow bag; this one is the biggest. Will harvest them before frost & freeze them for a year consumption. I haven’t had to buy lemongrass in the past 2 years & we use it a lot in Thai cooking but I grow enough for our family. No pesticides & much fresher than buying from stores

https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=10160631114573000&set=pcb.6059716887406043

See what Kenyan pupils are achieving. What about the Malawian kids ?

A message from Orina Dominic – KENYA

Orina Dominic is a teacher and gardener who generously play a role of teaching people and school children

youtube.com/channel/UCYUaEP1wHX4_t610RMnj3hw

My pupils have learnt innovative gardening! What a beautiful result sukima wiki grown in sacks… – https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=144270868337485&set=a.115227937908445

HOW WILL WE PRODUCE FOOD CROPS IN MALAWI IN THE FUTURE?

I reach out to politicians all over the world, farmers and all those who believe they have something to say about this subject (but I advise them to take first a look at the pictures below).

Would there be only one single way for “farming”, no other (better, less environmentally harmful) technique? For the production of food crops, I keep thinking for example of container-gardening and vertical-gardening, which are much easier to perform and a lot less water consuming. As for livestock farming, I leave the research work to the scientists in that sector. Also there a lot has changed since the Middle Ages ! The progress of that scientific branch is not paralyzed, is’n it? They will also come up with good solutions!

Let us face the future with confidence, for we have also overcome the plague and the polio. “We’re not doomed!” : see below what our friends from UCG (Urban Container Gardening) in the Philippines have accomplished in just a few years. They too had grandparents who farmed differently.

Cauliflower and Brussels sprouts in container

A message of Ashley Gilstrap, Dacusville, South Carolina

10 days of growth on some of my cauliflower and brussel sprouts. This is my first serious gardening effort and I’m amazed to see how fast they grow.

===

Something for the Malawian families ?

https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10158819870397724&set=gm.6040644255979973&idorvanity=221343224576801

Do refugees in Malawi need food ? Choose the solution : (1) cash assistance to buy food (by WFP) or (2) container gardening in their camp to grow their own food ?

I was reading in https://www.voanews.com/a/refugees-in-malawi-protest-over-food-ration-delays/6775631.html :

HIghlights

  • Muhamad Bashiri, who was among the protesters, said “we were complaining about the delay in receiving cash handouts we use to buy food. We received our last handouts four months ago.”
  • “He said the lack of assistance has sometimes made his family of three children go days without food.”
  • The U.N. World Food Program is responsible for providing cash for food assistance to over 50,000 refugees at the Dzaleka camp. But recently the organization said it lacked the funds to meet the needs of all the refugees.”
  • “UNHCR works closely with WFP and camp management and also the refugee leaders. We always conduct meetings to inform the refugees about the challenges, and update them on when they are able to get their cash assistance.”
  • “…. more financial assistance is still needed to ensure the refugees get regular cash for food payments next year”

=======================================

Experts interested in food problems know very well that container gardening is a successful strategy to help undernourrished and hungry people.

All over the world, even in the worst situations food crops can be grown at almost no costs in all sorts of containers (pots, bottles, sack, bags, etc.).

We find it quite unbelievable that a protesting refugee in Malawi still has to say that “the lack of cash assistance has sometimes made his family of three children go days without food ” and that Mr. Paul Turnbull, country director for the WFP in Malawi, confirmed that “more financial assistance is still needed to ensure the refugees get regular cash for food payments next year“.

Why is the choice between (1) cash assistance and (2) container gardening so difficult if (1) sufficient financial assiatnce is lacking and (2) container gardening can be set up at the lowest cost ?

Ask the refugees ?

Refugees in Malawi Protest Over Food Ration Delays

https://www.voanews.com/a/refugees-in-malawi-protest-over-food-ration-delays/6775631.html


Refugees protest against the delay of World Food Program cash handouts they use to buy food, at Dzaleka refugee camp, north of Lilongwe, Malawi, Oct. 4,2022. (Lameck Masina/VOA)
Refugees protest against the delay of World Food Program cash handouts they use to buy food, at Dzaleka refugee camp, north of Lilongwe, Malawi, Oct. 4,2022. (Lameck Masina/VOA)

BLANTYRE, MALAWI — 

In Malawi, hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers held protests Tuesday over delays for promised cash assistance to buy food. Protesters told VOA they have waited almost four months for promised handouts and are struggling to feed their families.

During their protests, the refugees marched to the U.N. offices inside the Dzaleka refugee camp in Dowa district, north of the capital Lilongwe, where they burned tires to draw attention to their concerns and anger.

Muhamad Bashiri, who was among the protesters, said “we were complaining about the delay in receiving cash handouts we use to buy food. We received our last handouts four months ago.”

He said the lack of assistance has sometimes made his family of three children go days without food.

A protester holds up a sign criticizing the delay of World Food Program cash handouts, at a rally at Dzaleka refugee camp, north of Lilongwe, Malawi, Oct. 4,2022. (Lameck Masina/VOA)
A protester holds up a sign criticizing the delay of World Food Program cash handouts, at a rally at Dzaleka refugee camp, north of Lilongwe, Malawi, Oct. 4,2022. (Lameck Masina/VOA)

The U.N. World Food Program is responsible for providing cash for food assistance to over 50,000 refugees at the Dzaleka camp.

But recently the organization said it lacked the funds to meet the needs of all the refugees.

In February, the WFP halted food rations to nearly 700 “self-sustaining” refugee families, citing funding limitations.

Kenyi Emmanuel Lukajo, the associate external relations and reporting officer for the U.N. refugee agency UNHCR in Malawi, told VOA Tuesday that the UNHCR is aware of the food shortage problems in Dzaleka, and that efforts have been made to update refugees on the situation.

“UNHCR works closely with WFP and camp management and also the refugee leaders. We always conduct meetings to inform the refugees about the challenges, and update them on when they are able to get their cash assistance.”

Paul Turnbull, country director for the WFP in Malawi, said the organization last made a cash handout in August and that the delay is because of financial constraints the organization has faced in recent years.

“Since May 2019 we have been doing a reduced food assistance ration between about 25% and 50% lower than the ideal ration,” he said. “Now we face risks of pipeline breaks for food assistance on several occasions and so this year we have encountered that.”

Turnbull said the refugees will resume getting cash handouts on October 10.

“We have now secured sufficient funding for the remaining months of the year,” he said. “So, for the remainder of 2022, we will be able to do the monthly distributions to the refugees.”

However, Turnbull said more financial assistance is still needed to ensure the refugees get regular cash for food payments next year.

A kitchen garden for all Malawians

A message from Orina Dominic (Kenya)

My thoughts💭💭 What if every family is having KITCHEN GARDEN?? 🤔

A kitchen garden can very well support our people in reducing the gravity of malnutrition in their health to a great extent through the regular supply of these all essential vitamins and minerals available in almost all the vegetables grown in kitchen garden.

https://www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=2854867354657923&set=pcb.2854867424657916

Linda M Bailey

It worked during WWII. 40% of all produce on America’s tables was grown in the backyards of regular Americans. Because they had to. Let’s make it trendy again.

Willem Van Cotthem

Anyone can build a kitchen garden in the smallest available space.

Jestin Vance-Gydesen

It’s just a simple matter of shifting idealisms. The super market was a success because they circumvented the hard work of a garden. With modern tech and ancient ways, gardening is getting a lot easier. Not to mention the discoveries with PGPMs and being able to alter a plants life cycle, i.e. shorter or longer life, shorter or longer flowering cycles, things like that. Keep crsipr out of it please. We can use natural sources just fine thank you.

A lot of delicious tomatoes in containers

A message from Orina Dominic (Kenya)

Yellow Pear Tomato Variety

This is an heirloom indeterminate tomato, disease resistant with a slight citrusy taste. The variety is easy to grow and highly productive throughout the season. The plant grows large hence the need to stake. It produces 5-12 fruits per cluster. The skin is yellow in color and pear shaped. The fruit is about 2 inches long. It matures in about 75 to 80 days. Yellow Pear is good for salads and snacking.

https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=2849249218553070&set=pcb.2849258328552159

If people can grow vegetables in containers on their terrace, the Malawians can grow them everywhere close to the house

A message by Ajai Singh

Kathleen Carter : There is nothing like fresh fruit/vegetables direct from the garden the taste is so different than from the supermarket!!!

https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=828406581660645&set=pcb.5939477259430007

WHERE TO DRILL HOLES IN YOUR CONTAINERS ?

By Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM (Ghent University, Belgium)

In the previous post ORINA Dominic (Kenya) is recommending to make holes in the bottom of your containers.

I am more in favour of making 2 opposite holes at 1 inch (2-3 cm) above the bottom in the sidewall of a container.

WHY WE DRILL DRAINAGE HOLES IN THE SIDEWALL OF OUR CONTAINERS

In order to save water and to keep the potting mix in our containers moistened for a longer time, we drill the drainage holes in the sidewall at somewhat 1-2 inches (2-3 cm) above the bottom. Thus, we keep a small reserve of water in the bottom of the container each time we water our plants (as not all the water runs away through holes in the bottom). That small reserve of water is keeping the potting mix moistened through capillarity and the plant roots get a supplementary quantity of water versus containers with holes in the bottom.

This technique is in fact a copy of what is happening in nature : when rain water is falling on the soil, it is running through some upper layers of soil (percolation) before it is collected on toop of a deeper layer of clay, where it is forming the layer of ground water. From there, water is slowly running upwards by capillarity, thus moistening the upper soil layers.

By drilling 2 opposite drainage holes in the sidewall of our containers, we not only avoid that too much water will stand too long in our container, but we create a “ground water layer” in the bottom of the container. From there, that ground water is gradually moistening the soil in our container by capillarity, which is continuously stimulating the growth of our plants.

https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10210243147014468&set=pcb.1247113411999772

PREPARATION OF CONTAINERS FOR YOUR KITCHEN GARDEN

By ORINA Dominic – Kenya

■After choosing your best containers for planting. Big, medium or small and of any height but not less than 30 cm height and wide enough to accommodate some seedlings.

●You need to first make the necessary holes for drainage at the bottom. That is why I always advice farmers to use plastic containers which will be easy to make some holes. You can use a Sharp pointed knife to drill them or burn a thick metal like nail and make holes easily. You can drill medium holes of a diameter about 2cm.

●After you are done with the holes, place your container where you want to set up your garden. You can decide to raise it by constructing a rack to place the container/sack or place it on the ground.

●The reason to raise your containers or sacks is to protect your vegetables from being destroyed by chickens or animals like goats, sheep etc

●The other reason is to make sure they receive enough sunlight.

■Remember we had prepared the soil ready waiting for planting.

Put some small stones at the bottom of a container a layer of a bout 6-7cm.

Then followed by a layer of sand of about 5-6cm.

This is to encourage good drainage of water and aeration in the containers.

Finally add your well prepared soil up to almost full but not full. Leave a space will come to add manure with time.

https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=2841508032660522&set=pcb.1223652625138334

TIPS FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF CONTAINER GARDENS

By ORINA Dominic – Kenya

●If you are a beginner of sack and containers gardening, you need to start to grow few types of vegetables and manageable number of sacks or containers.

●With time as you gain experience you can add other vegetables you like.

●If you start with many different vegetables at once, it will be difficult for you to manage and finally they will disappoint you!

●You may start growing each of the combination below….

1. Spinach and kales

2. Lettuce and spinach

3. Amaranthus, celery and corriander

4. Capsicum and Celery or corriander

5. Beetroot? Celery and spinach

6. Tomatoes will be done alone because they need a lot of attention.

7. For herbs you can grow a multiple because they don’t need much work.

■Remember the above👆 rule is for the beginners.

■Then after gaining enough experience you can grow as many variety of vegetables as you can.

ABOVE ALL YOU MUST BE;

– PATIENT, DETERMINED AND LOVE YOUR WORK.

Tomatoes – https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=2835535186591140&set=pcb.1219474582222805

Kale

Wall gardens

By Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM (Ghent University, Belgium)

HOW DO WE BUILD A WALL GARDEN?

The easiest way to set up a garden against a facade or a wall is to build 2-3 towers of plastic storage boxes next to each other. We stack 3-4 rows of boxes to the easy to reach height.

In 3 side walls of such a box we drill holes with a diameter of 3-4 cm. The distance between those holes is to be determined by the size (size) of the plants that will grow in them. We can place young plantlets or cuttings (vegetables, herbs, flowering plants, etc.) through the holes, so that their roots can continue to grow in the soil inside the boxes. The fourth side wall will not get any holes because it will stand against the facade or wall.

First we put a layer of potting soil (or garden soil) on the bottom of a box up to the height of the lowest hole (or the lowest holes if they are drilled at the same height). We spray water over that soil to moisten it well, even make it quite wet. Now we plant young plantlets or cuttings in the lowest hole (or holes if there are several). The upper parts of the plantlets (stems and leaves) protrude through the holes, their root system lies inside on the first soil layer. We lay a second layer of soil over the first root systems up to the height of the higher, middle holes. We spray this second layer of soil abundantly here as well to lower the soil level a bit.

In this way we can add new young plantlets or cuttings to that higher layer (stems and leaves outwards, roots inwards). Over that second set, middle root systems, a new layer of soil comes up to the height of the top holes.

Finally, we now continue to fill the box with soil, until the container is completely filled. We also water the box abundantly to make the entire content very moist and to allow the soil to settle as well as possible. If necessary, we will eventually add an extra layer of soil to fill the box completely to the brim.- (See photos 2, 3 and 4). – We do this because the second row of boxes will be placed on the floor of the bottom row.

The boxes of the second row are placed on top of the soil of the bottom row. We drill a few holes in the bottom of these tanks, so that a larger amount of water that could accumulate there (e. g. during prolonged rain) can still pass through to the bottom row of boxes. Those of the second row are filled and planted in the same way as the bottom row. This row is also watered abundantly to get the soil as moist as possible.- (See photos 5, 6 and 7) –

As soon as the second row of boxes is placed against the facade or wall, we start filling the boxes for the third row. This is of course done in the same way as with the previous row (with drainage holes in the bottom)-(See photo no. eight) –

In the end we will place three rows of boxes against the facade in this way (2 towers, each 3 boxes high) – (See photos 9 to 13) –

The facade or wall garden is now complete. In this example, it is planted with various flowering plants or cuttings thereof (ornamental plants). Of course you can also turn it into a vegetable or herb garden.

Finally, we place another box without any holes in the side walls on top. It is the water tank (water reservoir); which we can occasionally fill with spray water. In the 2 side walls, which each reach out above a tower, we drill 1 small hole of, for example, 2 mm. Once filled, the water runs slowly (like a “piss”) through those 2 holes in the bottom of the top row of boxes. – (See photo 14) –

WHAT ARE THE MAJOR BENEFITS OF A WALL GARDEN ?

(1) A larger number of plants per unit area, e.g. 60 or more per half square meter (see our example below). This number could also be increased to the maximum (depending on the plant species) without additional costs.

(2) Lower costs than for production with traditional horticultural methods.

(3) Quantity of water used = only 30% of normal watering.

(4) If this technique were to be applied in classical rural farming (agriculture), then, on the same area, e. g. 1 hectare, up to 10 times more could be harvested with significantly less watering.

====

Are you convinced that it would be a good idea to apply container gardening and vertical gardening (also in agriculture!) on a large scale?

It would certainly help to eradicate child malnutrition and famine.

Would this be heard everywhere? Also where decisions are made and billions are needed for plasters on hunger wounds?

YES WE CAN !!!

===

Farmer-centered Mega Farms and small-scale wall gardens for smallholder farmers and urban citizens

====

Wall gardens

By Prof. Dr. Willem VAN COTTHEM (Ghent University, Belgium)

HOW DO WE BUILD A WALL GARDEN?

The easiest way to set up a garden against a facade or a wall is to build 2-3 towers of plastic storage boxes next to each other. We stack 3-4 rows of boxes to the easy to reach height.

In 3 side walls of such a box we drill holes with a diameter of 3-4 cm. The distance between those holes is to be determined by the size (size) of the plants that will grow in them. We can place young plantlets or cuttings (vegetables, herbs, flowering plants, etc.) through the holes, so that their roots can continue to grow in the soil inside the boxes. The fourth side wall will not get any holes because it will stand against the facade or wall.

First we put a layer of potting soil (or garden soil) on the bottom of a box up to the height of the lowest hole (or the lowest holes if they are drilled at the same height). We spray water over that soil to moisten it well, even make it quite wet. Now we plant young plantlets or cuttings in the lowest hole (or holes if there are several). The upper parts of the plantlets (stems and leaves) protrude through the holes, their root system lies inside on the first soil layer. We lay a second layer of soil over the first root systems up to the height of the higher, middle holes. We spray this second layer of soil abundantly here as well to lower the soil level a bit.

In this way we can add new young plantlets or cuttings to that higher layer (stems and leaves outwards, roots inwards). Over that second set, middle root systems, a new layer of soil comes up to the height of the top holes.

Finally, we now continue to fill the box with soil, until the container is completely filled. We also water the box abundantly to make the entire content very moist and to allow the soil to settle as well as possible. If necessary, we will eventually add an extra layer of soil to fill the box completely to the brim.- (See photos 2, 3 and 4). – We do this because the second row of boxes will be placed on the floor of the bottom row.

The boxes of the second row are placed on top of the soil of the bottom row. We drill a few holes in the bottom of these tanks, so that a larger amount of water that could accumulate there (e. g. during prolonged rain) can still pass through to the bottom row of boxes. Those of the second row are filled and planted in the same way as the bottom row. This row is also watered abundantly to get the soil as moist as possible.- (See photos 5, 6 and 7) –

As soon as the second row of boxes is placed against the facade or wall, we start filling the boxes for the third row. This is of course done in the same way as with the previous row (with drainage holes in the bottom)-(See photo no. eight) –

In the end we will place three rows of boxes against the facade in this way (2 towers, each 3 boxes high) – (See photos 9 to 13) –

The facade or wall garden is now complete. In this example, it is planted with various flowering plants or cuttings thereof (ornamental plants). Of course you can also turn it into a vegetable or herb garden.

Finally, we place another box without any holes in the side walls on top. It is the water tank (water reservoir); which we can occasionally fill with spray water. In the 2 side walls, which each reach out above a tower, we drill 1 small hole of, for example, 2 mm. Once filled, the water runs slowly (like a “piss”) through those 2 holes in the bottom of the top row of boxes. – (See photo 14) –

WHAT ARE THE MAJOR BENEFITS OF A WALL GARDEN ?

(1) A larger number of plants per unit area, e.g. 60 or more per half square meter (see our example below). This number could also be increased to the maximum (depending on the plant species) without additional costs.

(2) Lower costs than for production with traditional horticultural methods.

(3) Quantity of water used = only 30% of normal watering.

(4) If this technique were to be applied in classical rural farming (agriculture), then, on the same area, e. g. 1 hectare, up to 10 times more could be harvested with significantly less watering.

====

Are you convinced that it would be a good idea to apply container gardening and vertical gardening (also in agriculture!) on a large scale?

It would certainly help to eradicate child malnutrition and famine.

Would this be heard everywhere? Also where decisions are made and billions are needed for plasters on hunger wounds?

YES WE CAN !!!

HOW DO WE BUILD A WALL GARDEN?

The easiest way to set up a garden against a facade or a wall is to build 2-3 towers of plastic storage boxes next to each other. We stack 3-4 rows of boxes to the easy to reach height.

In 3 side walls of such a box we drill holes with a diameter of 3-4 cm. The distance between those holes is to be determined by the size (size) of the plants that will grow in them. We can place young plantlets or cuttings (vegetables, herbs, flowering plants, etc.) through the holes, so that their roots can continue to grow in the soil inside the boxes. The fourth side wall will not get any holes because it will stand against the facade or wall.

First we put a layer of potting soil (or garden soil) on the bottom of a box up to the height of the lowest hole (or the lowest holes if they are drilled at the same height). We spray water over that soil to moisten it well, even make it quite wet. Now we plant young plantlets or cuttings in the lowest hole (or holes if there are several). The upper parts of the plantlets (stems and leaves) protrude through the holes, their root system lies inside on the first soil layer. We lay a second layer of soil over the first root systems up to the height of the higher, middle holes. We spray this second layer of soil abundantly here as well to lower the soil level a bit.

In this way we can add new young plantlets or cuttings to that higher layer (stems and leaves outwards, roots inwards). Over that second set, middle root systems, a new layer of soil comes up to the height of the top holes.

Finally, we now continue to fill the box with soil, until the container is completely filled. We also water the box abundantly to make the entire content very moist and to allow the soil to settle as well as possible. If necessary, we will eventually add an extra layer of soil to fill the box completely to the brim.- (See photos 2, 3 and 4). – We do this because the second row of boxes will be placed on the floor of the bottom row.

The boxes of the second row are placed on top of the soil of the bottom row. We drill a few holes in the bottom of these tanks, so that a larger amount of water that could accumulate there (e. g. during prolonged rain) can still pass through to the bottom row of boxes. Those of the second row are filled and planted in the same way as the bottom row. This row is also watered abundantly to get the soil as moist as possible.- (See photos 5, 6 and 7) –

As soon as the second row of boxes is placed against the facade or wall, we start filling the boxes for the third row. This is of course done in the same way as with the previous row (with drainage holes in the bottom)-(See photo no. eight) –

In the end we will place three rows of boxes against the facade in this way (2 towers, each 3 boxes high) – (See photos 9 to 13) –

The facade or wall garden is now complete. In this example, it is planted with various flowering plants or cuttings thereof (ornamental plants). Of course you can also turn it into a vegetable or herb garden.

Finally, we place another box without any holes in the side walls on top. It is the water tank (water reservoir); which we can occasionally fill with spray water. In the 2 side walls, which each reach out above a tower, we drill 1 small hole of, for example, 2 mm. Once filled, the water runs slowly (like a “piss”) through those 2 holes in the bottom of the top row of boxes. – (See photo 14) –

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The demonstration model of this facade or wall garden was built by Gilbert VAN DAMME and Camiel BAUTS, both of whom we congratulate for the excellent work done. These yellow trays were donated free to us by a local Bakery .

We now have further plans for building a wall garden with vegetables and herbs next spring.

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WHAT ARE THE MAJOR BENEFITS OF A WALL GARDEN ?

(1) A larger number of plants per unit area, e.g. 60 or more per half square meter (see our example below). This number could also be increased to the maximum (depending on the plant species) without additional costs.

(2) Lower costs than for production with traditional horticultural methods.

(3) Quantity of water used = only 30% of normal watering.

(4) If this technique were to be applied in classical rural farming (agriculture), then, on the same area, e. g. 1 hectare, up to 10 times more could be harvested with significantly less watering.

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Are you convinced that it would be a good idea to apply container gardening and vertical gardening (also in agriculture!) on a large scale?

It would certainly help to eradicate child malnutrition and famine.

Would this be heard everywhere? Also where decisions are made and billions are needed for plasters on hunger wounds?

YES WE CAN !!!

You would certainly like to have such a kitchen garden

This garden consists of 10 large buckets and five raised beds, which so far this summer have produced string beans, sugar snap peas, green peppers, onions, jalapeno peppers, a golden orange pepper, tomatoes, yellow and purple beans,

https://www.sunjournal.com/2022/08/21/rumford-librarys-first-container-garden-a-success-story/?fbclid=IwAR1jMIMtTN2dlafVahk-3vn7BidYNUT7m3wswLczuhJGtuWP6iXJ6WKihv0
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